Highfield Country Club

If you used to live in Driffield, and have moved on, why not drop a quick note and let everyone know how you are getting on.

Highfield Country Club

Postby Lynn » Mon Mar 19, 2001 8:00 pm

I am seeking information on Highfield. I use to live there as a little girl when Daisy Marshall, my grandmother, used to manage the club.

I now live in Canada and would like some of the history, hauntings and folklore of Highfield and surounding area for my children to see where mom grew up.

Yours Sincerly

Lynn Kent.

(Daughter of Jane and Tony Stonehouse)
Lynn
 
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Postby garrym » Tue May 18, 2004 8:25 am

quote:
Originally posted by Lynn
I am seeking information on Highfield. I use to live there as a little girl when Daisy Marshall, my grandmother, used to manage the club.

I now live in Canada and would like some of the history, hauntings and folklore of Highfield and surounding area for my children to see where mom grew up.

Yours Sincerly

Lynn Kent.

(Daughter of Jane and Tony Stonehouse)



garry marshall
garry marshall
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Postby garrym » Tue May 18, 2004 8:32 am

Lynn,
This is your uncle garry,
Yes, I can recall a few hauntings.
The night when the dogs Cluna and Mitzi bristled when footsteps were heard down the passage by the kitchen, there was no one there !

I was going up to bed on the top landing when the lights went out, I was near the lightswithc and switched them on only to find they went of again., this happened several times.

I used to get up for work at 5.30 to catch the early train to hull.
I was halfway down the big car[eted staicase when I heard footsteps coming up the carpeted stairs. I went back up to bed !

Some of the customers used to play tricks in the dining room by taking off the electric bell cover and inserting a sixpence to make them ring continuously.
Many happy memories of Highfield and mum.
Garry

quote:
Originally posted by Lynn
I am seeking information on Highfield. I use to live there as a little girl when Daisy Marshall, my grandmother, used to manage the club.

I now live in Canada and would like some of the history, hauntings and folklore of Highfield and surounding area for my children to see where mom grew up.

Yours Sincerly

Lynn Kent.

(Daughter of Jane and Tony Stonehouse)



garry marshall
garry marshall
garrym
 
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Postby garrym » Tue May 18, 2004 8:36 am

Hello Steve, I am Garry Marshall Daisy's son.
Vi and daisy were sisters so daisy was also your aunty.
You must remember my granny speck ?
I know Gran used to tell my about Kilham, is that where you came from ?
We also had an Aunt Edith Bollon from Nafferton and Kate Saltmer from Wansford
Garry

quote:
Originally posted by SteveSpeck
Lynn

I cant remember anything much of the Highfield, but my aunt Vi (McKnight) used to work there, and that's where I know Daisy's name from.

Steve Speck



garry marshall
garry marshall
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Postby jim sharpe » Wed May 19, 2004 8:22 pm

Reply to Lynn Kent
I remember you well as a child, you can contact me on
jim.sharpe@ntlworld.com
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Postby snoopy » Thu Jun 08, 2006 8:52 pm

Hi I am Debbie Simpson, my husband John and his family owned Highfield for 30 years and we have many tales of hauntings. I too saw a shadow walk past the kitchens, it wasnt solid, but was clearly a human figure. John heard footsteps many times, he followed them around the house but couldnt find anyone.One particular time still sets his hair on end when he talks about it.
Their cleaner, Esmee saw figures in the house and also walking accross the grounds.
We have no idea who any of these people could have been but it would be interesting to find out
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Postby Rosie » Fri Jun 09, 2006 8:40 pm

Don't know much about the history of Highfield but I remember having mt wedding reception there on 1968!

nee Rosemary Burks
nee Rosemary Burks
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Postby mcknil » Wed Sep 12, 2007 9:14 pm

Vi McKnight was my husband's grandmother. Do any of you remember anything about her husband Alexander McKnight?

Thanks

Louise McKnight
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Postby DriffieldPostcards » Thu Nov 06, 2008 9:58 pm

I have plenty of very old postcards of Highfield. What a building. No ghosts on the pics though!!!
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Postby plook » Wed May 30, 2012 11:14 am

DRIFFIELD
TA 0258
WINDMILL HILL
(West side)
491/12/10008
High Field Country Club

Large house now country club. 1864, designed by H J Paull for Mr Agnas, a retired draper. Remodelled 1882-85 by Temple Moore for Harrison Holt JP of Hull, at a total cost of 3,796. White brick to ground floor with applied timber- framing above, plain tile roofs and white brick and ashlar stacks. North entrance front has irregular 8 window faade with 5 gables. Off-centre 2 storey projecting porch, reached up 5 ashlar steps, with segment arch and 6-light overlight. Double panel doors, and above a jettied square bay window of 18-lights with 9-lights to each side. Either side single 4-light cross casements. Projecting right wing has ashlar 5-light canted bay window and above large 5-light Ipswich window, and 5-light casement in gable. To left 9 irregular casement windows, and above 4 cross casements. Projecting left wing has upper oriel window with central square bay. West symmetrical front has recessed centre with glazed entrance and double doors, either side single 5-light cross casement windows. Above blank centre with single 5-light oriel cross casement windows, and above again 2-light dormer window flanked by 5-light casements. South front very irregular, with projecting 2 storey wing containing billiard room on upper floor with large gabled oriel window with 24-lights. East service front has off-centre doorway with projecting ornate wooden gabled porch with bell, flanking 3-light casements. Above 5-light cross casement window, small dormer with 4-light casement.
INTERIOR has well preserved main reception rooms. Drawing room has full height arcaded panelling with large fireplace, plaster frieze and ceiling. Dining room has dado panelling, plaster frieze, carved doorcases and fireplaces. Panelled entrance hall with carved door frames and plaster ceilings. Scroll baluster dog-leg staircase with dado panelling and open round arched arcade on upper floor. Service stair has turned balusters and moulded handle. Billiard room has open single hammerbeam roof, panelling and large segment arched fireplace. Upper rooms also retain fireplaces, doors and some panelling.Listing NGR: TA0229058368 Source: English Heritage
The grassy mound towards the north end of the town called Moot Hill was the site of an early parliament, Roman settlement and the motte of a Norman castle. The nearby Park was once the site of an Anglo-Saxon palace. Opposite this man-made eminence is a well-wooded bluff topped by the black and white Tudor-style Highfield Country Club, where a century ago stood a five-sailed windmill. Source: http://www.driffield.co.uk/town.htm

That Driffield was a place of importance far back in the centuries is beyond doubt. We are told in the Saxon Chronicle that Alfrid, king of Northumbria, died at Driffield on the nineteenth before the kalends of January, in the year 705, and a tablet in the church of Little Driffield states that he was interred within that edifice. It is, therefore, very probable that Driffield was a royal residence in those days, and in a field at the north end of the town is a mound bearing the name of Castle Hill, which, we may suppose, was the site of the royal palace. It was protected by a moat, which still remains, nearly 20 feet deep on the western side. Alfrid was an amiable and peaceful sovereign, who had spent much of his early life in the pursuit of learning in the monastery of Iona, and was afterwards known as Alfrid the Wise. There are conflicting accounts as to the cause of his death. William of Malmsbury says he died of a painful disease; but tradition avers that he was wounded in a battle at Ebberston, that he managed to escape from the field to the shelter of a cave hard by, whence he was removed next day to Little Driffield. The cave, which is now scarcely perceptible, has been known from time immemorial as Ilfrid's Hole.
Across the stream which appears to form part of the moat is Moat Hill, from which proclamations were issued to the people, laws passed for the government of Northumbria, and from which the Saxon Church received its charter of extension from the learned and amiable king.
It is contended on very strong evidence that the famous Battle of Brunanburh was fought at Battleburn, a few miles to the west of Driffield, and that the army of Anlaf was encamped at Elmswell, in this parish. A series of earthworks at this place points to such a conclusion. By the side of an entrenchment near the supposed site of the battle, Mr. Mortimer opened sixty graves, all apparently Anglo-Saxon. In a distinct portion of an adjacent burial ground, the bodies were found to have been cremated, or partially so, from which circumstance it is inferred they were those of Scandinavians, amongst whom the practice of burning their dead still existed. Mr. Holderness, of Driffield, has written an exhaustive pamphlet on Brunanburh and its site, and those of our readers who wish to go more deeply into the question cannot do better than study that work.
Previous to the Norman Conquest the manor of Driffield formed part of the possessions of Earl Morcar. It is mentioned in Domesday Book as containing 50 carucates of land to be taxed, and possessing two churches. The manor was afterwards held by the Earls of Chester, and, later, it was given by Henry III. to his sister Joan, on her marriage with Alexander, king of Scotland. After the death of Joan, the manor reverted to the Crown, and was subsequently conferred upon John de Baliol. Baliol became king of Scotland, which crown he swore to wear as the vassal of the king of England, but, shortly afterwards renouncing this vassalage, the manor was forfeited, and it remained with the Crown until 1336, when it was granted to Geoffrey le Scroope. It subsequently passed through other hands, and now belongs, as before stated, to Viscountess Downe, of Baldersby.
Great Driffield is one of the chief market towns of the East Riding, being centrally located in the best all-round agricultural district in Yorkshire. It is pleasantly situated at the foot of the Wolds, whence flow numerous clear crystal streams, which unite eventually, and add their contribution to swell the waters of the river Hull. These streams have long been famous for the delicacy and flavour of the trout they produce, and are well preserved by an association formed in 1833. The town is distant 20 miles north by east from Hull, 34 by rail and 22 by road from Scarborough, 13 north from Beverley, 12 south-west from Bridlington, and 196 north from London. It is the junction of the Malton and Driffield, and the Hull and Scarborough branches of the North-Eastern Railway. Source:GREAT DRIFFIELD:
Geographical and Historical information from the year 1892.
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